Find a Meeting

There are online directories which contain listings of regular and selective Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. Search for a meeting by name, city, or zip code.

closest meetings

are you an alcoholic?

Service

From holding a General Service position to answering phones after hours, there are many ways for those in recovery to give back. Please be of service in recovery.

be of service



link to document


“We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable” You knew you needed to get sober. Everyone was disgusted with you, and you were disgusted with your own behavior. Still smarting from the last time you parked your car on the neighbor’s lawn, you swore you wouldn’t drink like that again. So, you go to a meeting and hear about the Twelve Steps. Still sweating alcohol through your pores, Step One flies by in a blur, “Yes, that’s me! I’m an alcoholic!” Easy peasy. You go to meetings and say, “Hi, I’m so and so, an alcoholic.” You believe you NAILED that one. Check! On to the other steps.

link to document


“Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.” Before becoming an active member of Alcoholics Anonymous, my prayer to God was something like this, “God, if you just get me out of this mess, I promise I won’t do that again.” When I drink, I would think of a lie on how I was going to get another drink. After the insanity passed and I would finally come to my senses, I would say to myself, “that wasn’t really that bad.”

link to document


“Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.” I didn’t want to become an alcoholic. I became one after my first drink; that drink was the solution to all of my affairs up to that point, for seventeen years. At the age of thirty-eight, I was ordered to Alcoholics Anonymous by a judge. He gave me a choice; I could go to prison for child abandonment or go into a recovery center. Since I had been to jails and institutions before, I chose a recovery home in Bellflower. When I got to the recovery center, I was physically, spiritually, and emotionally broken. I didn’t know that I was powerless and hopeless. I remember the day when I was living in an alley with a baby, and got on my knees and asked God for help. At that point, I honestly thought I would die in that alley with a tag on my toe saying “Jane Doe.” As the fog lifted, I thanked God for the judge that knew what I needed, Alcoholics Anonymous.

link to document


“Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.” The following preface to this subject matter is a poem I wrote after the last fourth step I finished: The choices I made yesterday are no longer the redeemers of my destiny. I stand today a man not governed by his predisposition to self-doubt and misguided self-will, but as a man lead by faith and courage, love and honesty, patience and integrity. The choices I made yesterday are but a guiding light into the void from whence I came, they are a series of beacons lighting a ferocious path across the ocean marking my journey as it began at the precipice of eternity. Courage will guide me through the troubled wa ters of my past and with faith I will persevere in my quest to understand my own true motivations, for these beacons I once looked at them with pain and guilt. These markers will become testaments of hope as I find enlightenment on my journey.

link to document


“Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.” The principle of Step 5 is integrity – an unimpaired condition; soundness; adherence to a code of moral, artistic, or other values; the quality or state of being complete or individual. What a principle! I don’t know about you, but this vocabulary was never a part of me in my drinking days. As for the fifth step, this was terrifying to me for several reasons. First off, why would I want to tell someone all of the secrets that keep me drunk? Second, I am a coward, and unwilling to walk through fear. Third, why would I tell someone about my sex life? That’s none of your business!

link to document


“Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.” Am I entirely ready to have God remove all of my defects of character, not just a few? Not always. Some of them are like a security blanket. They are a smelly blanket of comfort and familiarity. The smell keeps people away, forcing me to put my blanket of defects away from time to time. It is when I feel insecure that I reach for its warmth again. The biggest part of this equation for me is what I truly believe about God. Do I believe that God is strong enough or even cares about me en ough to remove these defects? To heal what appears to be broken in me? Sometimes that answer is no. That is when I surrender to the defect and not to God. I was taught that I couldn’t stop participating in a behavior without replacing it with something of equal or greater value. Otherwise, I would go back into the behavior. Do I feel God is of equal or greater value than my defect? How can I give up something, even something harmful, if I do not believe in my heart of hearts that I have a sufficient substitute? In order for me to step across a bridge that is shaky and take the hand outstretched, I have to believe that hand is strong enough to not let me fall.

link to document


Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.” In step 7 of the 12×12 it says that ” humility, as a word, is often misunderstood”. When asked, what is the opposite of humility; my first guess would be Pride. Who could argue that? It was in my 22nd year of sobriety, when I had a phone call from my first wife’s husband at the time and the conversation started going south. I was trying to refrain from bickering with him and when he couldn’t get any traction, he made the statement that, “He had heard stories about me in the past, and that I was no angel.” I thought about for a few seconds, and responded “Dave, I’ve done a lot of things in my life that I’m not proud of, but I’m not ashamed of anything I’ve done in the last 22 years.” The call ended peacefully.

link to document


“Made a List of all people I had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.” MY BUCKET LIST I’ve heard the term “bucket list” and understand it to be a list of thing that I want to accomplish before I transion from this earthly body. The 8th step was my personal “bucket list”, which consisted of people, instuons and principals that needed to be dealt with before I could begin a life-long journey of recovery from alcoholism. While the term bucket list is o$en used as described above, there, too, is a Hollywood producon of the same name starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman. In this movie, Jack Nicholson tries to convince Morgan Freeman to join him on his bucket list adventures, one of which was sky diving. Morgan Free man was unwilling to jump, and just like the Morgan Freeman character, I was unwilling to jump into the amends process in Step 9. The thought of making amends to th e people on my list was as scary a prospect as free falling towards the earth depicted in the movie’s skydiving scenario. Thankfully, my sponsor managed to pierce through my fear by reminding me that I’d made a vow to go to any length to stop drinking and using and, just like in the movie, I had a parachute, which is the fellowship of AA.

link to document


“Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.” The step that separates the sober man from the hopeless drunk… Having hit my absolute bottom after relapsing for the umpteenth time in early 2002, I finally sobered up for good in a tiny desert town with the priceless help of a sponsor who happened to be a longtime family friend and a sober member of AA for more than 25 years. I carefully completed the first eight Steps, which included a true “white light” experience in Steps 6 and 7 that instilled hope and confirmed the limitless power of God, our fellowship, and our beloved program.

link to document


“Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.” My father was a great believer in the Socratic maxim that “the unexamined life is not worth living.” He was convinced that the quest for genuine self-knowledge, though it often reveals unpleasant truths, is still the only workable foundation for a valuable life. I never asked him to explain why he was so attracted to this point of view or what he thought it meant. Had I done so, I don’t expect his explanation would have satisfied me or even made much sense. I was not a fearless child and the idea of uncompromising self-honesty made me uncomfortable. Even before I discovered alcohol, I learned to mask the real reasons for my behavior in layers of denial, self-justification and rationalization. I tended to move away from self-knowledge rather than toward it. Not until desperation drove me to the doors of Alcoholics Anonymous did I really begin to grasp the importance of self-examination. First there was pain. Living hurt. I didn’t begin my recovery from alcoholism until I was in my late fifties. By the time I joined the fellowship, I was utterly baffled and confused. I knew next to nothing about my self and what I did know, I didn’t much like. I was drinking to blunt a growing sense that my life was a pointless exercise in futility, and slowly but surely, that solution was beginning to break down. Out of pain came willingness. I abandoned myself to the idea that an entirely different way of seeing the world was both possible and necessary. The Twelve Steps provided me with a path to follow and for that I am deeply grateful.

About A.A.

This is a wider card with supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content. This content is a little bit longer.

Hospitals & Institutions

This is a wider card with supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content. This content is a little bit longer.

AA Literature

This card has supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content.

Service Opportunities

This card has supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content.

Harbor Light

This card has supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content.

12 Step Program of Recovery from Alcoholism

This is a wider card with supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content. This card has even longer content than the first to show that equal height action.

Contact Information

This is a wider card with supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content. This card has even longer content than the first to show that equal height action.

Links

This is a wider card with supporting text below as a natural lead-in to additional content. This card has even longer content than the first to show that equal height action.